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African-Americans and Asian Americans are more enthusiastic moviegoers than white American audiences. Hispanic audiences account for 20% or more of opening weekend ticket sales for blockbuster movies in the U.S. Women account for 52% of the moviegoing audience, and major releases with female leads keep upsetting expectations — like Scarlet Johanssen’s Lucy, which smashed Dwayne Johnson’s Hercules at the box office. On top of all that, the international audience for movies is more important than ever before, with almost 70% of studio revenues coming from foreign markets.
Disney is clearly switched on about all of this, and it’s easy to see that understanding reflected in the decision to cast black actors John Boyega and Lupita Nyong’o in key roles in the next Star Wars movie, and Gwendoline Christie in a role reportedly written for a man. That all goes some way to addressing the sci-fi franchise’s historic shortage of women and people of color. It’s also evident in the decision to adapt Marvel’s Big Hero 6 with a diverse cast — though sadly at the expense of several Asian characters. It’s notable that Disney Animation, rather than Marvel Studios, saw the potential in that property, and the feature carries no Marvel branding whatsoever.

This appreciation for a changing audience isn’t limited to movies. One only need look at another Disney subsidiary to see the importance Disney attaches to female and non-white audiences.
Disney’s ABC television network is launching three sitcoms this fall with minority casts, as well as the first sitcom to feature an Asian American as the romantic lead (Selfie). ABC has given a whole night of primetime programming to a black woman, writer/producer Shonda Rimes, with two of her three hours led by black female leads. Dramas with female leads have done very well for the network — with Once Upon A Time and Scandal as standout examples — and all the successful dramas launched by ABC in the last couple of years have featured black leading characters except Nashville and Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD.
Even ABC Family, once known as an evangelical Christian network, has weirdly become home to some of the most inclusive shows on television, like the queer-friendly Pretty Little Liars and The Fosters.
Come to that, another Disney-owned company has made impressive strides with diversity in just the past year, launching its highest ever number of series with female leads and people of color, and integrating significant LGBT content into its output. That company is of course Marvel. Marvel Comics, that is; not Marvel Studios.

I don’t know if all of this is the result of a Disney-wide initiative to improve diversity within its output, or if it’s simply writers and commissioning editors taking advantage of the fact that the changing market means less resistance at the top. I suspect it’s a little of both. What’s clear is that Marvel Studios has not taken advantage of that change with the same rapidity. It hasn’t anticipated that change, and it hasn’t left itself in a position to quickly adapt to that change.

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good isms 

lion:

when someone reading in class and your name is in the story

image

omf bye 

140831 Mini Fanmeet 
[ © HalMony ] Do not edit/crop/remove the watermark.
140831 Mini Fanmeet 
[ © HalMony ] Do not edit/crop/remove the watermark.
©